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May

Ms. Stephanie Campo, Cohort 1 graduate, opened up her environmental business. Check it out! http://www.scenvironmentalists.com/

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August

After analyzing data from rocks, fossils and genetic studies, a team of international researchers found the land bridge, known as the Isthmus of Panama, formed 2.8 million years ago. This finding contradicts recent studies arguing the land bridge came together anywhere from 6 to 23 million years ago, and it offers insight about the evolution and migration of animals in the region.

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Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and FIU have established a new partnership that will serve FIU students as well as citizens of Collier County and surrounding areas. This unique educational and research partnership will enhance the environmental understanding necessary to manage the reserve’s 110,000 acres.

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A massive bloom of blue-green algae has hit four counties in Florida covering beaches along the Atlantic coast, damaging aquatic environments, impacting businesses and potentially causing health problems for the people and animals that come into contact with it. Governor Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency in Lee, Martin, Palm Beach and St. Lucie counties. FIU has the following experts available to discuss how algal blooms form, how they impact the environment, their potential human

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In July, when South Florida became the first place in the U.S. to report locally transmitted Zika cases, the eyes of the nation turned to our area and found several FIU experts with deep knowledge and a willingness to help the community navigate the Zika outbreak.

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At the beginning of the year, FIU convened a panel discussion with university experts in public health, medicine and science to address the disease and its implications for South Florida.

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Matthew DeGennaro is determined to stop the world’s deadliest animal. The FIU biologist is the first scientist in the world to create a mutant mosquito — a feat he achieved in 2010 as a researcher at Rockefeller University in New York.

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Some fans are quiet, but weak. Others are powerful, but noisy. According to Dyson, their Air Multiplier fans are quiet and powerful. Perhaps that is why one of the world’s most endangered birds prefers a Dyson.

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September

Protected areas can stop people from cutting and burning trees in the Amazon, but they can’t keep rising temperatures out. In a recent study, FIU biologist Kenneth Feeley found that in as little as 35 years at least 19 percent and as many as 67 percent of the Amazon’s protected areas will not have the same temperatures or climates found today. The actual changes will depend on the rate of warming. With changes in climate already being realized in the Amazon, plants are on the move, migrating

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It’s National Collect Rocks Day, so FIU News reached out to faculty members in the Department of Earth and Environment to learn about the rocks that set their careers in motion.

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Alumni Steven Leider is featured on Biscayne Times article about tourist park and shares his outtake on conservation. Congrats Steven!

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October

When it comes to storing carbon, scientists have put a price tag on the value of mangroves in Everglades National Park and it’s in the billions. Based on a scientific cost estimate, the stored carbon is worth between $2 billion and $3.4 billion, the researchers found. It is a relatively small price when considering the cost to society if the carbon currently stored in these mangroves were ever released into the atmosphere, according to the scientists.

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Two cold spells, two years apart, in two subtropical regions of the world have given scientists clues to what happens when an extreme climate event strikes. By tracking conditions before, during and after a 2008 cold spell in China and a 2010 cold spell in Florida, FIU researchers found chilling effects on plants and animals, but not all were equal. Tropical species suffered more than their temperate counterparts, which were able to resist and recover from the record low temperatures.

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Due to the expected impact of Hurricane Matthew on South Florida, FIU will be closed today, Wednesday, starting at 5 p.m., as well as Thursday, Oct. 6 and Friday, Oct. 7, 2016.

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In an effort to understand the diets of plant-loving fish, FIU Ph.D. student Jessica Sanchez and marine sciences professor Joel Trexler delved into the world of herbivory in freshwater ecosystems. They wanted to develop a research framework for other scientists to follow in studies on the evolution of these diets. Their efforts resulted in a scientific paper that was published in a recent issue of Ecosphere. It was the 800th scientific paper published by research faculty in FIU’s Southeast Envir

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November

Alligators are one of the Florida Everglades’ most famous predators. They sit at the top of the food chain and influence the world around them by how they hunt and what they eat. But FIU biologist Bradley Strickland believes they also impact the ecosystem from the bottom of the food chain up.

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Bottlenose dolphins in the Florida Coastal Everglades have higher concentrations of mercury than any other populations in the world. FIU scientists examined dolphins from the lower Florida Keys, Everglades National Park and Florida Bay, looking for mercury and organic pollutants in their skin and blubber. Not only did they find high mercury levels in the coastal Everglades dolphins, but they found the highest levels of concentration ever recorded.

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Interned at blueEnergy – an international organization dedicated to sustainable solutions to complex challenges in Bluefields, Nicaragua – for 4 weeks. Our team hosted workshops to help local residents become energy independent by utilizing clean energy, solar power, and creating household gardens for food.

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Researchers from around the world often struggle with similar challenges, but by coming together to share their experiences, they are improving how they communicate and how they work. Biologist John Kominoski was among a handful of FIU researchers who came together with scientists and partners with an interest in environmental science and policy at the International Long Term Ecological Research Network’s first Open Science Meeting in South Africa last month.

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